A Perfume For each Situation

The first makeup designed expressly for motion pictures was visit here created by Max Factor in 1910. It was a light, semiliquid greasepaint available in jars in a precisely graduated range of tan tone, suitable for the lighting and orthochromatic film emulsion used during that period. The introduction of panchromatic film and incandescent lighting on movie sets eventually made it possible to standardize the film, lighting, and colours of makeup that were most effective for motion pictures. The Society of Motion Picture Engineers conducted a special series of tests for this purpose in 1928.

As a result of these experiments, Max Factor created a completely new range of makeup colours called panchromatic makeup, an achievement for which he won a special Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences Award. Motion-picture makeup is both corrective and creative. Makeup must always be applied skillfully, delicately, and subtly so that facial expression will have natural freedom. On the screen, particularly in close-ups, the face may be magnified many times larger than life size, so that every complexion flaw or crudely applied makeup artifice is clearly discernible. As a corrective art, makeup serves to (1) cover blemishes, (2) provide the face with a smooth and even colour tone for the most effective photography, (3) clearly define the facial features for more visibly expressive action, (4) make the player appear more attractive, and (5) ensure a uniform appearance before the camera.

As a creative art, makeup enables the player to take on the appearance of almost any type of character. It can make the young appear to age believably and the old appear to look young again. Special makeup devices can supply the performer with any desired facial feature, from the weird effects of science fiction and horror movies to the bruises, wounds, and scars of western and war films.The first makeup designed expressly for motion pictures was created by Max Factor in 1910. It was a light, semiliquid greasepaint available in jars in a precisely graduated range of tan tone, suitable for the lighting and orthochromatic film emulsion used during that period.

The introduction of panchromatic film and incandescent lighting on movie sets eventually made it possible to standardize the film, lighting, and colours of makeup that were most effective for motion pictures. The Society of Motion Picture Engineers conducted a special series of tests for this purpose in 1928. As a result of these experiments, Max Factor created a completely new range of makeup colours called panchromatic makeup, an achievement for which he won a special Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences Award. Motion-picture makeup is both corrective and creative.

Makeup must always be applied skillfully, delicately, and subtly so that facial expression will have natural freedom. On the screen, particularly in close-ups, the face may be magnified many times larger than life size, so that every complexion flaw or crudely applied makeup artifice is clearly discernible. As a corrective art, makeup serves to cover blemishes,  provide the face with a smooth and even colour tone for the most effective photography, clearly define the facial features for more visibly expressive action,  make the player appear more attractive, and ensure a uniform appearance before the camera. As a creative art, makeup enables the player to take on the appearance of almost any type of character. It can make the young appear to age believably and the old appear to look young again. Special makeup devices can supply the performer with any desired facial feature, from the weird effects of science fiction and horror movies to the bruises, wounds, and scars of western and war films.

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